New York becomes largest U.S. city to guarantee workers the right to earn paid sick days

While many New Yorkers were asleep last night, the city council overrode Mayor Michael Bloomberg's veto

While most New Yorkers slept, last night the city council overrode Mayor Michael Bloomberg’s previous veto of paid sick days legislation. [Photo: dorlino, Flickr Creative Commons]

(Cross-posted from Washington Policy Watch)

This morning New York City became the fifth U.S. city – and the largest – to guarantee workers the right to earn paid sick days on the job.

More than 1 million people will be covered by the new law. Employees of businesses with 20 or more workers can earn up to five paid sick days a year beginning in April 2014; at enterprises with 15 to 19 workers, paid sick days will kick in by October 2015. Smaller businesses are required to provide five unpaid sick days per year, meaning that workers couldn’t get fired for using those days.

The victory comes after a three-year marathon effort. New York’s paid sick days bill was first introduced on August 20, 2009. A little after 2 a.m. today it reached the finish line, when the New York City Council overrode Mayor Michael Bloomberg’s previous veto of the legislation – with a stronger vote than its original passage, by a margin of 47-4.

Four other cities and one state have already established similar laws: San Francisco, CA; Portland, OR; Seattle, WA; Washington, DC; and Connecticut. The Healthy Tacoma coalition is working with local leaders to introduce paid sick days legislation in that city as well.

About seattlehealthyworkforce

The Seattle Coalition for a Healthy Workforce is a diverse coalition of businesses, faith-based, labor, family, and community groups. We’re working to ensure everyone has paid sick days, so we can all have safer food, healthier families and more productive workplaces.
This entry was posted in In the news, Paid sick days and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s